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Moore and Miller Reign Supreme in U.S. House Fundraising, Leaving Rivals in the Dust

Moore and Miller Reign Supreme in U.S. House Fundraising, Leaving Rivals in the Dust

The recent campaign finance reports reveal that State Treasurer Riley Moore is leading in fundraising for the Republican primary in the 2nd Congressional District, while U.S. Rep. Carol Miller has a significant financial advantage over her opponent in the 1st Congressional District.

The Federal Election Commission’s campaign finance reports, which cover the period between July, August, and October, were due on Sunday. In the 2nd Congressional District, Moore raised $141,151 for the quarter, bringing his total contributions for the year to $617,159. He currently has $492,967 in cash-on-hand. Moore’s joint fundraising committee, Team Riley, raised $36,330 for the quarter, with $3,140 in cash-on-hand. Notably, Moore’s campaign has received contributions from only seven individual donors. Moore, who is nearing the end of his first term as State Treasurer, has a background in the U.S. House of Representatives’ Committee on Foreign Affairs.

In the same district, Nate Cain, a U.S. Army veteran and businessman in the cybersecurity industry, raised $27,715 for the quarter, bringing his total contributions for the year to $61,935. He currently has $2,098 in cash-on-hand. However, more than 35% of Cain’s reported donations are listed as in-kind contributions to his campaign. Joe Earley, a U.S. Army veteran and cybersecurity professional, raised $14,100 for the quarter and $30,373 for the year. He has $80,131 in cash-on-hand, but $80,000 of that comes from a loan to his campaign. Alexander Gaaserud raised no money during the quarter and has only raised $5,400 since entering the race last year. He has $11 in cash-on-hand and $8,000 in loans/debts.

In the 1st Congressional District, Miller raised $131,981 for the quarter, bringing her total contributions for the year to $442,195. She has $228,696 in cash-on-hand. However, Miller also reported $417,993 in debt/loans, including $411,900 in remaining balances on loans she took out for her first congressional campaign in 2018. Miller, who represented the 3rd Congressional District for two terms before the redistricting, won election to the new 1st District after the state dropped from three to two districts following the 2020 U.S. Census.

Overall, Moore and Miller have emerged as the top fundraisers in their respective districts, giving them a financial advantage as they seek re-election or pursue higher office.

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